St. John's Episcopal Church

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Celebrating over 150 years of worship and service.

Outreach

Deacon Lynn's Food Pantry Challenge!

Every week, St. John's collects food to donate to the Food Pantry of Pleasantville.

It has been in operation since the mid-1980’s and began as a place where neighbors could help their neighbors in need. This tradition continues today.
Mission Statement:

To provide fresh, nutritious food to the hungry in Westchester County, by growing and gathering healthy vegetables for local food pantries. The garden is maintained and operated by multi-generational local volunteer groups and individuals working together to aid people in need. The garden is organic and adheres to reduce/reuse/recycle principles.

Overview:

The idea of the Pleasantville Community Garden was developed by Devin Juros, a 7th grader at the time, who wanted to help his community and the hungry in Westchester. During the winter of 2013, Devin worked on the concept of a community garden and later he presented the idea to his family who accepted the idea and agreed to help him in his quest. After that, the process of creating the garden gained traction as contacts were made and relationships formed in the community. The list of supporters slowly grew as he presented to more community members and community groups and met more people. As the idea started to become reality more fundraising was implemented and the preparations for the construction of the garden took shape. During two weekends in May and June of 2014 the garden was built with the support of over 100 local volunteers. In the first calendar year, over 1,500 pounds of fresh vegetables were grown and gathered and donated to local food pantries.  We graciously thank the town of Pleasantville, the people of Pleasantville, St. John's Church and everyone else who has supported our cause - we could not have done it without you.
What is the WRTF?  It's a group of Episcopal Churches, civic groups and other Christian denominations who have gathered together to  help furnish refugee apartments through an organization called IRIS - Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services.  The primary focus is to collect gently used furnishings (no mattresses or pillows, they must be new) for a room or apartment for a refugee family moving to the United States.
Mission:
The A-HOME mission is to strengthen northern Westchester neighborhoods by providing people safe and affordable places to live - the foundation of a stable life.

Who They Are:
A leader in developing, owning and managing affordable housing in northern Westchester. A-HOME offers an integrated approach to help low-income individuals and families move from crisis to self-sufficiency.

Who They Serve:
A-HOME serves low-income individuals with disabilities and single-parent families who, because of age, disability or family status, cannot afford market-rate rents. Often people are homeless or living in sub-standard housing before coming to A-HOME. Once at A-HOME, residents pay an affordable portion of their income for rent and are helped by case managers to develop the skills, resources, and relationships needed to be more self sufficient and reclaim their lives.
Midnight Run is a volunteer organization dedicated to finding common ground between the housed and the homeless. 

In over 1,000 relief missions per year, Midnight Run volunteers from churches, synagogues, schools and other civic groups distribute food, clothing, blankets and personal care items to the homeless poor on the streets of New York City. The late-night relief efforts create a forum for trust, sharing, understanding and affection. That human exchange, rather than the exchange of goods, is the essence of the Midnight Run mission. 

Midnight Run is not a solution to homelessness. Our goal is to forge a bond between housed and homeless people by establishing a foundation of sharing and caring from which solutions may evolve. Through Midnight Run, volunteers come to see the homeless as real people, not a commodity. And homeless men and women learn that many mainstream adults and teenagers have commitments and concerns that go beyond their own lives and families.
How could you imagine a better future, if you didn’t even know what it would look like? If poverty, hunger and fear walked with you every day, how would you visualize getting an education, being part of a stable, loving family or contributing to society?

At El Hogar, we find the most desperate children – the ones on the streets, the ones without enough to eat, the ones at most risk — and show them what a better future looks like. We give them the love, the support and the tools to help make this vision their new reality.One child at a time, we are planting the seeds of hope for a new, more prosperous Honduras.